A Goode House Renovation, Before and After

A Goode House is a blog that is maintained by a Texas couple as they renovate their mid-century modern home. Since 2009, they have been restoring a 1958 house, designed and owned by local architect D. Rex Goode. The photos below document the journey of this beautiful modern home.

Mid-Century Modern Goode House

Walkway Modernist

Courtyard After Modern Backyard Mid-Century Modern Living Area Vintage Bathroom Renovation Guest Bedroom Renovation Modernist Remodeled Hallway

Modern Kitchen Space Modernist Dining Room

May 28th, 2013|7 Comments

Inspire Me Monday: Great Uses for Modern Prefab Spaces

A lot of Modernist exhibitions of late are showcasing beautiful, mid-century modern inspired prefab spaces. We’re intrigued by the idea of easy-to-build, low-energy spaces that are affordable. Honestly, the possibilities are endless; a prefab structure could be used for anything from low-cost housing to vacation getaways. Here are a few of our favorite designs and ideas:

Prefab Separate Guest Room

Photo Credit: Houzz.com

Photo Credit: Houzz.com

Photo Credit: HGTV Remodels

Photo Credit: HGTV Remodels

Backyard Playroom or Playhouse

Photo Credit: Inhabitat.com

Photo Credit: Inhabitat.com

Photo Credit Dwell.com

Photo Credit Dwell.com

Photo Credit: Dwell.com

Photo Credit: Dwell.com

 

Prefab Vacation Home

Photo Credit: Houzz.com

Photo Credit: Houzz.com

Photo Credit: Apartment Therapy

Photo Credit: Apartment Therapy

Photo Credit: Dwell.com

Photo Credit: Dwell.com

 

Rooftop Getaway

Photo Credit: Weburbanist.com

Photo Credit: Weburbanist.com

A Traveling Modernist Relic

Airstream Trailer

Photo Credit: Houzz.com

 

 

 

May 6th, 2013|0 Comments

When Size Doesn’t Matter

Size doesn’t matter when you’re inventive enough to know what to do with some extra space.  Architect Bjorn Siemsen proved this in the German city of Kiel which now claims to have the “narrowest” house in Europe. The six-story building is sandwiched between two larger buildings, is 2.8 feet at its narrowest point and about 15 feet in front.  Siemsen was essentially working with a gap between two buildings and since the space was so small, he simply used his neighbors’ walls for his own home.  The natural insulation from the other buildings helped conserve space and energy.  Siemsen won an environmental award for his brilliant yet narrow home.

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December 1st, 2010|0 Comments

Tour Opulent Architecture From AIA/LA

The second round of the AIA/LA fall home tours is happening this Sunday, October 17.  From Brentwood to the Palisades, the AIA narrowed down the creme de la creme of luxurious homes for your viewing pleasure.

“We want to show tour goers a certain level of wealth in terms of constructions, materials, details, views and of course, square footage. OFF SUNSET will give Angelinos a small taste of pure palatial living.”  says Carlo Caccavale, Associate Director for AIA Los Angeles.

I’ll be there attempting to contain myself from combusting from all the architectural decadence.  Be sure to tune in next week for some magnificent highlights.

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October 15th, 2010|Comments Off

Watchtower House

Maybe it’s the kid in me that was drawn to this fort like house in Cedar Hill, Texas or maybe I’m curious about the watchtower views.  Cunningham Architects had fun with this one.  They used native stacked stone to create a 182 foot long, 21 foot high wall inside reminiscent of a castle and the observation tower is the perfect place to appreciate views of the protected habitat that goes on for several acres.  Dallas and even Forth Worth can be seen from lighthouse.

The home looks like a modern museum from the exterior and the ground floor is spacious enough to entertain at least 100 0f your closest friends.  Another one of my favorites is the window embedded into the stone wall showcasing the greenness of the protected habitat beyond.  Don’t even get me started on the landscape and pool area.

Read more.

Photography by James F. Wilson and Mark McWilliams

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September 27th, 2010|0 Comments