The Frank Lloyd Wright Legacy, Part 1: Bloodlines

The architect who is heralded by many as the greatest modern architect of all time touched the world of architecture in countless ways. Besides the fact that his groundbreaking ideas changed the world of design forever, Lloyd Wright’s work and instruction at both of his Taliesin studios influenced scores of architects that went on to become some of the best and brightest in the industry.

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Taliesin West in Scottsdale Arizona, 1937. Photo by Andrew Horne.

Even though his personal life was tumultuous and sometimes tragic, two of Lloyd Wright’s sons and two of his grandchildren followed his footsteps into the world of architecture. Here is a look at their work:

Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr.

The eldest son of Frank Lloyd Wright senior and his first wife, Catherine Lee Tobin, Lloyd Wright, Jr. studied architecture and landscape architecture briefly before jumping into the working world in Southern California in 1911. Although he specialized in landscapes, Lloyd Wright, Jr. worked in architecture as well, often hand in hand with the likes of Irving Gill, Rudolf Schindler, and of course, his father.

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Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr. (right) with father Frank Lloyd Wright senior and son John Lloyd Wright.

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Wayfarers Chapel in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA – 1949. Photo courtesy of Fine Art America.

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The Sowden House (aka The Black Dahlia House) in Hollywood, 1926. Photo courtesy of House Crazy.

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Frank Lloyd Wright senior’s Millard House with landscape design by Lloyd Wright, Jr. Photo courtesy of Millardhouse.com.

John Lloyd Wright

Despite the fact that John Lloyd Wright’s relationship with his father was decidedly rocky, the architecture giant’s second-eldest son nonetheless followed in his father’s footsteps after a brief stint as a toy designer. John left his mark in both worlds, designing the famous Lincoln Logs toys before moving on to architecture, where he contributed to both the Prairie School and International Styles.

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Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

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Frank E. Compton House in La Jolla, CA – 1948. Photo by Julius Shulman.

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Cookson House in San Fernando, CA – 1958. Photo by Charles Schneider.

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MacPherson Studio House in Del Mar, CA – 1947. Photo courtesy of Modern San Diego.

Elizabeth Wright Ingraham

John Lloyd Wright’s daughter also seemed to exhibit the designer genes of her grandfather. She studied architecture with Mies van der Rohe at the Armour Institute and also attended the University of California at Berkeley before apprenticing at her grandfather’s famous architecture program at Taliesin. After settling with her husband in Colorado during the 1940s, Wright Ingraham designed hundreds of buildings in and around Colorado.

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Elizabeth Wright Ingraham with husband, Gordon Ingraham. Photo courtesy of The Gazette.

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Fountain Library in Colorado, 2005. Photo courtesy of The Gazette.

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Solaz house in Manitou Springs, CO – 1969.  Photo courtesy of The Gazette.

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Beadle House in Colorado Springs, 1951. Photo courtesy of The Gazette.

Eric Lloyd Wright

Another grandchild of Frank Lloyd Wright, Eric Lloyd Wright was born to Lloyd Wright, Jr. in 1929. After graduating from UCLA, he immediately began working with his father and grandfather at Taliesin and Taliesin West. He later founded his own architectural firm Eric Lloyd Wright Architects and Planners, which is still practicing today.

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Eric Lloyd Wright with grandfather Frank Lloyd Wright. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

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Good Shepherd Community Church in Des Plaines, ME – 1960. Photo courtesy of Revitalize Des Plaines.

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Ross House in Silver Lake, CA – 1957. Photo courtesy of Michael Locke.

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Santaranta in Finland, 2011. Photo courtesy of the Embassy of Finland.

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June 23rd, 2016|0 Comments

Architecture Spotlight: Mid-Century Mexico

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Hotel Chica Boca in Acapulco, designed by Antonio Peles during the 1950s. Photo courtesy of MODern deSIGN.

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Hotel Chica Boca in Acapulco, designed by Antonio Peles during the 1950s. Photo courtesy of MODern deSIGN.

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Hotel Chica Boca in Acapulco, designed by Antonio Peles during the 1950s. Photo courtesy of MODern deSIGN.

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Hotel Chica Boca in Acapulco, designed by Antonio Peles during the 1950s. Photo courtesy of MODern deSIGN.

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Casa Cetto in Mexico City, designed in 1951 by Max Cetto. Photo courtesy of Life Magazine.

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Casa Cetto in Mexico City, designed in 1951 by Max Cetto. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

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Casa Cetto in Mexico City, designed in 1951 by Max Cetto. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

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Casa Cetto in Mexico City, designed in 1951 by Max Cetto. Photo courtesy of Life Magazine.

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Escuela Normal Nº 1 in Toluca, designed in 1966 by Gustavo Gallo Carpio and Angel Azorín Poch. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

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Escuela Normal Nº 1 in Toluca, designed in 1966 by Gustavo Gallo Carpio and Angel Azorín Poch. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

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Escuela Normal Nº 1 in Toluca, designed in 1966 by Gustavo Gallo Carpio and Angel Azorín Poch. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

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Casa Galvez in San Angel, designed by Antonio Attolini in 1959. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

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Casa Galvez in San Angel, designed by Antonio Attolini in 1959. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

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Casa Galvez in San Angel, designed by Antonio Attolini in 1959. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

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Casa Galvez in San Angel, designed by Antonio Attolini in 1959. Photo courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

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June 22nd, 2016|0 Comments

Real Estate Roundup: June 2016

Rare Frank Lloyd Wright House in Minneapolis: $1,495,000

A rare Wright-designed home in Minneapolis has just gone up for sale for the first time ever—by its original owners. The three-bedroom, 2,647-square-foot home was designed by Wright in 1958 and completed in 1960 for Paul C. Olfelt, a radiologist. The Olfelts worked with Wright personally before the architect’s death in 1959.

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Ranch Style Time Capsule in New Jersey: $419K

A 1958 3-bedroom in Wayne, New Jersey has been carefully preserved in beautiful mid-mod style, complete with original materials and fixtures like mustard carpets, stone fireplaces, and pink tile bathrooms.

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Private Walled Architectural Sanctuary in Clearwater, FL: $689,000

This private, walled architectural sanctuary was designed in authentic Frank Lloyd Wright Usonian style by Architect Joe McClung in 1961 with multiple terraces, two fireplaces, five bedrooms, two dens and a built-in office.

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Updated Mies van der Rohe in Detroit: $345K

These townhouses were designed by a legend and remain a perfect example of his genius. This unit is nestled in a quiet, woodsy community and sports the quintessential floor-to-ceiling windows, along with a beautiful kitchen and built-ins.

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June 21st, 2016|0 Comments

Inspire Me Monday: Post-Mid-Century Modernism (Yes, It’s a Thing)

While the phrase “post-mid-century modernism” is quite the mouthful, a huge range of unsung modernist architecture was designed throughout the late ’60s, ’70s, and even the ’80s. While it is clearly not mid-century modernism, the modern influence played a big part. A recent article by Curbed lauds the community of Palm Springs, CA for seeing the value in this unique architectural time period.

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Woodlands Information Center in Texas, designed in 1973 by Bennie Gonzales. Photo courtesy of Modern Phoenix.

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Palm Springs Public Library, designed in 1973 by William Cody. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

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Tahquitz Plaza in Palm Springs, designed by Hugh M. Kaptur in 1973. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

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Andreas Plaza in Palm Springs, designed by Christopher Mills. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

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Seventh Day Adventist church by Laszlo Sandor. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

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1970s home in Denver. Photo courtesy of Denver Urbanism.

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Nakagin Capsule Tower in Tokyo, designed by Kisho Kurokawa in 1972. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

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Ontario Science Centre, designed by Raymond Moriyama in 1969. Photo courtesy of Toronto Modern.

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Left: Tahquitz Plaza; right: Musicland Hotel; both by Hugh Kaptur during the 1970s. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

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June 20th, 2016|0 Comments

Los Angeles’s Dingbats Apartments: Love ‘em or Hate ‘em?

These are not the most beloved of mid-century designs in Los Angeles, but there are many who have a special affection for these boxy, cookie-cutter apartment buildings that were constructed en masse during the 1950s. It was inexpensive, low-rent buildings like these that made LA’s legendary sprawl possible, and these quirky apartments have come to define a certain architectural and life-style of the city.

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Although the dingbats may not stay around forever, they will live on in our hearts, and in a new book! The Los Angeles Forum for Architecture & Urban Design (LA Forum) recently launched a $12,000 Kickstarter campaign to fund the book Dingbat 2.0, which features essays by Barbara Bestor and Wim de Wit, plus a photo essay by longtime dingbat chronicler Judy Fiskin.

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Photos courtesy of LAist and Architizer.

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June 7th, 2016|0 Comments