Abandoned Mid-Century Homes are Eerily Beautiful

This collection of photos from the Better Shelter Blog is a testament to the timeless quality of mid-century modern architecture. Even in various stages of abandonment and decay, these houses remain eerily beautiful.

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Futuristic Mobile Housing for your Space Age Fantasies

We miss the good old days when mobile housing and resort cabins looked more like UFOs from an outer space flick. Here are some delightful examples of futuristic mobile housing straight out of the space age.

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Images courtesy of MCM Revival.

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Images courtesy of Taschen Boeken.

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Images courtesy of Hooked on Houses.

By |September 25th, 2014|architecture, Design|1 Comment

Architecture Spotlight: Mid-Century Mexico

Locations like Southern California and Denmark receive much of the credit for mid-century modern architecture, but the modernism movement was more far-reaching. Today, we explore some of the amazing mid-century structures of Mexico, stretching from the U.S. border to Mexico City. Some of these structures have been preserved while many others are no longer in existence.

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Camino Real Hotel by Ricardo Legorreta, 1968.

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Camino Real Hotel by Ricardo Legorreta, 1968.

NEW Museo de Arte Moderno. Bosque de Chapultepec. Pedro Ramírez Vázquez. 1964

Mexico City’s Museo de Arte Moderno by Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, 1964.

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Mexico City’s Museo de Arte Moderno by Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, 1964.

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Sculpture ‘La Familia’ by Horst Hartung, 1964.

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A home in Álvaro Obregón by Jaime Ortiz Monasteri, 1958.

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Steel framed house by Jaime López Bermúdez, 1950.

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Garita Internacional by architects Guillermo Rosell y Manuel Larrosa, 1952.

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Advertisment for Knoll Internacional de Mexico at the Colegio de México, 1961. Now destroyed.

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Justicia del Distrito Federal by Enrique del Moral, 1961. Now destroyed.

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Mercado Municipal de San Juan de los Lagos by Luis Moreno and Vicente Guerrero, 1968.

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María Isabel Sheraton Hotel by architects José Villagrán García, Juan Sordo Madaleno, and Ricardo Legorreta, 1963.

NEW La Capilla de Palmira by Architects Guillermo Rosell, Manuel Larrosa, and Félix Candela

La Capilla de Palmira by Architects Guillermo Rosell, Manuel Larrosa, and Félix Candela, 1959.

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Jockey Club in Chihuahua by Galgodromo.

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Gimnasio ‘Gustavo Díaz Ordaz’ by Manuel González Rul, 1968. Now destroyed.

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Seguros la Provincial by Augusto H Álvarez, 1967.

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Colegio de México by Manuel Rosen Morrison, 1961. Now destroyed.

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Centro Médico Nacional by Alejandro Prieto Posada, 1960.

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Auditorio Benito Juárez by Julio de la Peña, 1968.

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Sol Rojo in Coyoacán by Alexander Calder, 1968.

All photos courtesy of Una Vida Moderna.

By |September 24th, 2014|architecture|0 Comments

Back to School Part 3: Cranbrook Academy of Art

Sometimes called the “Cradle of American Modernism,” the Cranbrook Academy of Art boasts such prestigious alumni as Eero Saarinen, Harry Bertoia, Florence Knoll, Charles Eames, and Ray Eames.

The Academy of Art was founded by George Gough Booth and Finnish architect Eliel Saarinen in 1932. From the beginning, the foundation was built using the latest ideals in art and architecture. Eliel Saarinen’s Brookside School Cranbrook, Institute of Science, Academy Art Museum, and Library buildings are still in use today and remain the most complete examples of the celebrated architect’s work.

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 Cranbrook Art Academy, Photo courtesy of the Cranbrook Archives.

Some say the seeds for American Modernism were born at Cranbrook, since some of the key innovators of the movement met while studying and teaching there. It was at Cranbrook that Eero Saarinen and Charles Eames began their long and fruitful friendship, and it was also here that a student named Ray Kaiser fell madly in love with her industrial design professor. Cranbrook is where Harry Bertoia learned to work with wire and metal, and the place that Florence Knoll studied furniture design. The list goes on.

Below we feature some of the artists and works that were born from the rich artistic community of the Cranbrook Academy of Art.

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Interior of the Saarinen House on the Cranbrook campus, designed by Eliel Saarinen in the early 1920s. Photo courtesy of Cranbrook Archives.

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Eliel and Loja Saarinen’s home studio, designed by Eliel Saarinen. Photo courtesy of Dula Notes.

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Prototype tea urn by Eliel Saarinen, 1934. Photo courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Cranbrook Tower and Quadrangle, designed by Eliel Saarinen in 1927, Photo courtesy of the Cranbrook Archives.

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Florence Knoll with Eero Saarinen at Cranbrook in 1947. Photo courtesy of Cranbrook Archives.

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Jewelry designed by Harry Bertoia during his time at Cranbrook, early 1940s. Photo courtesy of Scoop on Design.

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Jewelry designed by Harry Bertoia during his time at Cranbrook, early 1940s. Photo courtesy of Scoop on Design.

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David B. Runnells with Eero and Eliel Saarinen on the Steps of Cranbrook Academy of Art, 1941. Photo by Charles Eames.

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Eliel Saarinen with Le Corbusier on Academy Way. Photo courtesy of the Cranbrook Archives.

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The Orpheus Fountain by Carl Milles, 1936. Photo courtesy of the Cranbrook Archives.

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Architecture sketch by Charles Eames for the Case Study House Program, 1941. Photo courtesy of the Cranbrook Archives.

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Organic Armchair, a collaboration of Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen for the “Organic Design in Home Furnishings” design competition at the Museum of Modern Art. 1940. Photo courtesy of the Vitra Design Museum.

Happy Birthday to Mr. Rodney Walker

Responsible for designing over 100 homes in Southern California between 1935 and 1970, Mr. Rodney Walker is synonymous with the ideals and legacy of the Case Study House Program.

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Rodney Walker and family, sitting outside a home of his own design, 1956. Photo courtesy of the Society of Architectural Historians.

After working under celebrated architect Rudolph Schindler for a number of years, Walker set out to build his own legacy in the early 1940s. His designs for the Case Study House Program were exceptional, and he was known for building modern homes at an attractive price point. Today we look back at some of his most acclaimed works and celebrate one of Los Angeles’s greats.

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Case Study House #16 by Rodney Walker, 1947. Photo courtesy of Retro Pop Planet. 

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Case Study House #16 by Rodney Walker, 1947. Photo courtesy of Arts and Architecture Magazine.

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The Walker Residence, 1959. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

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The Walker Residence, 1959. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

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This 1947 home in Brentwood was once the personal residence of A. Quincy Jones. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

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Case Study House #18 by Rodney Walker, 1948. Photo courtesy of Arts and Architecture Magazine.

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The Walker Residence, 1959. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

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The Walker Residence, 1959. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

Mid-century Modern Backyard

This 1947 home in Brentwood was once the personal residence of A. Quincy Jones. Photo courtesy of Curbed LA.

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Case Study House #16 by Rodney Walker, 1947. Photo courtesy of Arts and Architecture Magazine.

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Fulton Residence, 1948. Photo by Julius Shulman.

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Case Study House #16 by Rodney Walker, 1947. Photo courtesy of Arts and Architecture Magazine.